Posts tagged photography

Kilauea, Hawaii

Lava flows on the East Rift Zone coastal plain of Kilauea, seen on May 4, 2012. The budding toes of pahoehoe flows are clearly seen in the foreground of the image. (Image Courtesy of USGS/HVO.)

Kilauea, Hawaii

Lava flows on the East Rift Zone coastal plain of Kilauea, seen on May 4, 2012. The budding toes of pahoehoe flows are clearly seen in the foreground of the image. (Image Courtesy of USGS/HVO.)

Ten Most Dangerous Volcanoes on the Globe

1.  Sakura-jima. Japan.  Since 1955 Sakurajima the stratovolcano in Kyūshū, Japan, often called the Vesuvius of the east, has been erupting almost constantly. Due to its location in a densely populated area, the volcano is considered to be one of the world’s most dangerous. The city of Kagoshima is inhabited by almost 700,000 residents and lies just a few kilometres from the mount. The city has even built special shelters where people can take refuge from falling debris. The volcano’s last eruption took place in March 2009, sending debris up to 2 km away.

2.  Etna. Italy. Mount Etna is Europe’s most active and tallest (3,300 m /10,900 ft) volcano and its potential for destruction is huge. Etna’s constant state of activity is a serious threat to people living in the villages and towns of Sicily. Its most dangerous eruption occurred in 1669, when lava destroyed many villages around the volcano’s base and “swallowed” part of Catania, an ancient town on the east cost of Sicily. In 1992 two streams of lava threatened Zafferana, a municipality inhabited by around 8,000 people.

3.  Kilauea. Hawaii (U.S.). Kilauea, the world’s most active volcano located on the Big Island of Hawaii, for many years has been considered fairly gentle, as relatively few people have been killed following its explosions. Recently, however, the scientists revealed Kilauea’s deadly face. Apparently, the volcano has an extensive layer of ash and rock called tephra that can be blasted high enough to be a hazard to passenger airplanes. The golf ball-size rocks can be thrown 17 kilometres (11 miles) out. The last time tephra erupted was between 500 and 200 years ago.

4. Cotopaxi. Ecuador. Cotopaxi, one of the tallest active volcanoes in the world, reaching a height of 5,897 m (19,347 ft), is a part of the Pacific Ring of Fire, a chain of volcanoes around the Pacific plate. Since 1783 the mount has erupted more than 50 times, posing a serious threat to the nearby cities and villages. Quito, the capital of Ecuador with around 1 million inhabitants, is located 60 km south and Latacunga, a historical town that has already been destroyed four times by earthquakes is 25 km northeast.

5.  Vesuvius. Italy. The legendary Mount Vesuvius sitting on the beautiful coast of the Bay of Naples in Italy has already proven that its destructive capabilities are enormous. In AD 79 a huge explosion wiped out the Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, killing up to 25,000 people. Vesuvius is ultra dangerous not only because there are 3 million people living nearby, but also due to the fact that its quiescence period has already been very long. Apparently, the longer the quiescence period, the stronger and more explosive the renewal of Vesuvius’ activity will probably be. In the past the mount’s eruptions were so violent that the whole of southern Europe was blanketed by ash.

6.  Merapi. Indonesia. Called the Mountain of Fire in Indonesian, Merapi is the most dangerous volcano in the country, erupting roughly once a decade. Since the 16th century it has been erupting regularly and causing serious threat to people inhabiting the surrounding areas. The violent mountain is located very close to the city of Yogyakarta, and some villages are situated as high as 1,700 m on the flanks of the volcano. In 2006, around 5,000 people were killed and 200,000 left homeless due to the earthquakes that followed Merapi’s eruption.

7.  Nyiragong. Congo. Nyiragongo and nearby Nyamuragira in Congo, Africa, are jointly responsible for 40% of the historical volcanic eruptions on the continent. Apparently, nowhere else on the globe does such a steep-sided stratovolcano contain a lake of such fluid lava like Nyiragongo. In 1977, the lava flowed down the flanks of the mount killing up to 100 people, though some reports point to about several thousand people. In 2002, the volcano erupted again, reaching the city of Goma, where at least 15% buildings were destroyed, leaving 120,000 people homeless and killing around 45 citizens.

8.  Popocatepetl. Mexico.  Another natural-born killer is Popocatepetl, a glacier-covered volcano situated only 70 km from Mexico City. Rising to around 5,400 (17,800 ft) above sea level, the eruption of “the Smoking Mountain” could be a serious threat not only to the capital city (inhabited by fairly 9 million people) but also to other towns and villages located very close to it. Popocatepetl is one of the most violent volcanoes in the country, having had around 20 huge eruptions since the 16th century. In 2000, tens of thousands of people were evacuated just before the volcano exploded and caused enormous glacial melting.

9.  Mount Teide. Spain. The world’s third largest volcano (from its base), Mount Teide, is located on Tenerife, the Canary Islands. Although Teide is currently dormant, further eruptions are possible in the near future, including the risk of pyroclastic flows and surges similar to those that occurred at Merapi or Mount Vesuvius in Italy. Due to Teide’s proximity to several large towns and resorts, the mount was designated one of the Decade Volcanoes by the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry, with the implication that it’s currently one of the world’s most dangerous volcanoes.

10.  Mount Rainier. Washington (U.S). The peacefully-looking Mount Rainer is in fact an active volcano that has the potential to devastate virtually all areas surrounding its base. It is located around 87 km southeast of Seattle, a major city on the West Coast of the USA. Despite the fact that the most recent recorded eruption took place at the end of the 19th century, lahars (a type of mudflow or landslide) pose serious risk to many communities that lie atop older lahar deposits. Such mudflows can even reach parts of downtown Seattle and cause tsunami in Puget Sound and Lake Washington.

Source: Ten Most Dangerous Volcanoes on the Globe

Fireworks  Yunlai Zha (GS)Dept. of Electrical Engineering
Arsenic sulphide dissolved in a solution displays colorful random patterns after being spin-coated and baked on a chrome-evaporated glass slide.
Fireworks
Yunlai Zha (GS)
Dept. of Electrical Engineering

Arsenic sulphide dissolved in a solution displays colorful random patterns after being spin-coated and baked on a chrome-evaporated glass slide.

Binary Code

The purpose of this work was to connect an object from an organic life cycle to technology. It is a photograph of a tree trunk, modified in Photoshop to reveal the patterns extruding from the bark. It resembles a form of binary code. What makes this picture interesting is the fact that it is such a simple object. Usually trees are often overlooked but by modifying this picture with a few different filters, I was able to make the photograph much more interesting, without distorting the true beauty of the bark. If people just take a second to appreciate everyday objects and connect them to other aspects of their lives, they may begin to see how beautiful life really is.

Binary Code

The purpose of this work was to connect an object from an organic life cycle to technology. It is a photograph of a tree trunk, modified in Photoshop to reveal the patterns extruding from the bark. It resembles a form of binary code. What makes this picture interesting is the fact that it is such a simple object. Usually trees are often overlooked but by modifying this picture with a few different filters, I was able to make the photograph much more interesting, without distorting the true beauty of the bark. If people just take a second to appreciate everyday objects and connect them to other aspects of their lives, they may begin to see how beautiful life really is.

Emerald Lakes.  I’ve always wanted to travel to New Zealand — so many geological wonders.  This photo, in particular, is stunning.  Take a look at this travel blog entry for more incredible photos. 

Emerald Lakes.  I’ve always wanted to travel to New Zealand — so many geological wonders.  This photo, in particular, is stunning.  Take a look at this travel blog entry for more incredible photos. 

Flower Power

The insignificant little plant, Arabidopsis thaliana or thale cress, is a boon to biological research. And even the most ordinary flower looks beautiful through the eyes of a microscope, does it not?

Image: Mendel’s Dream Arabidopsis flower captured with confocal microscopy by Heiti Paves, Centre of Excellence ENVIRON, Estonia.

Flower Power

The insignificant little plant, Arabidopsis thaliana or thale cress, is a boon to biological research. And even the most ordinary flower looks beautiful through the eyes of a microscope, does it not?

Image: Mendel’s Dream Arabidopsis flower captured with confocal microscopy by Heiti Paves, Centre of Excellence ENVIRON, Estonia.

Goblin Valley, Utah

Goblin Valley, Utah

Burgess Shale, British Columbia

Burgess Shale, British Columbia

Fire Opal

"Mexican fire opal comes to us with a variety of characteristics. Yellow to deep orange body color with the very unusual hues moving into the reds. Like opal from other parts of the world, Mexican fire opal can display full-spectrum play of color. This month’s phenomenal featured stone has all the components of a top notch collector’s gem.

As we look internally, we find another visually stimulating characteristic. Stalagmite and stalactite formations occur within fire opal and are usually composed of goethite rods encrusted in limonite. There also seems to be some hematite crystals inside.”

Source.

BORA BORA FROM SPACE
This dramatic aerial photograph of Bora Bora was taken by France and Italy’s recently launched Pleidades-HR Satellite in January of 2012. The satellite orbits the Earth at an altitude of 694 km (431 miles). Pleiades is made of two “small satellites” (mass of one ton) offering a spatial resolution at nadir of 0.7 m and a field of view of 20 km. [Source]
Bora Bora is an island in the Leeward group of the Society Islands of French Polynesia, an overseas collectivity of France in the Pacific Ocean. The island, located about 230 kilometres (140 mi) northwest of Papeete, is surrounded by a lagoon and a barrier reef. In the center of the island are the remnants of an extinct volcano rising to two peaks, Mount Pahia and Mount Otemanu, the highest point at 727 metres (2,385 ft).
Bora Bora is a major international tourist destination, famous for its aqua-centric luxury resorts. The island is served by Bora Bora Airport on Motu Mete in the north, with Air Tahiti providing daily flights to and from Papeete on Tahiti. The major settlement, Vaitape is on the western side of the main island, opposite the main channel into the lagoon. According to a census performed in 2008, the permanent population of Bora Bora is 8,880. [Source]   If you would like to see more pictures of Bora Bora, check out this 25-picture gallery posted earlier on the Sifter.

BORA BORA FROM SPACE

This dramatic aerial photograph of Bora Bora was taken by France and Italy’s recently launched Pleidades-HR Satellite in January of 2012. The satellite orbits the Earth at an altitude of 694 km (431 miles). Pleiades is made of two “small satellites” (mass of one ton) offering a spatial resolution at nadir of 0.7 m and a field of view of 20 km. [Source]

Bora Bora is an island in the Leeward group of the Society Islands of French Polynesia, an overseas collectivity of France in the Pacific Ocean. The island, located about 230 kilometres (140 mi) northwest of Papeete, is surrounded by a lagoon and a barrier reef. In the center of the island are the remnants of an extinct volcano rising to two peaks, Mount Pahia and Mount Otemanu, the highest point at 727 metres (2,385 ft).

Bora Bora is a major international tourist destination, famous for its aqua-centric luxury resorts. The island is served by Bora Bora Airport on Motu Mete in the north, with Air Tahiti providing daily flights to and from Papeete on Tahiti. The major settlement, Vaitape is on the western side of the main island, opposite the main channel into the lagoon. According to a census performed in 2008, the permanent population of Bora Bora is 8,880. [Source]
 
If you would like to see more pictures of Bora Bora, check out this 25-picture gallery posted earlier on the Sifter.


A Rainbow of Possibilities



A montage of fluorescent microscopy images depicts pluripotent mouse stem cells that have been encouraged to develop into various kinds of specialized tissues by a mix of chemical signals. Researchers in the Biomedical Engineering lab of Charles Gersbach are developing new methods for controlling cell behavior so that stem cells might be used to repair damaged tissues or treat genetic diseases. Each color combination represents a new cell type emerging from a previously uniform cell population. This image was one of the entries in the 2011 Abhijit Mahato Photo Contest. Credit: Pablo-Perez-Pinera & Jonathan Brunger

A Rainbow of Possibilities

A montage of fluorescent microscopy images depicts pluripotent mouse stem cells that have been encouraged to develop into various kinds of specialized tissues by a mix of chemical signals. Researchers in the Biomedical Engineering lab of Charles Gersbach are developing new methods for controlling cell behavior so that stem cells might be used to repair damaged tissues or treat genetic diseases. Each color combination represents a new cell type emerging from a previously uniform cell population. This image was one of the entries in the 2011 Abhijit Mahato Photo Contest. Credit: Pablo-Perez-Pinera & Jonathan Brunger

Where the Snow Is Like KnivesThese sharp snow formations make the white stuff look uninviting. They’re called penitentes, and although they can form at high altitudes anywhere, there’s no place better to see them than in the Dry Andes of Chile and Argentina, way up past 13,000 feet (about 4,000 meters). Penitentes, named after pointy hats worn by people doing penance for their sins in Christian traditions, form in very cold, dry air, where the water in snow sublimates, or turns directly into vapor without melting first. Sublimation randomly occurs faster in some areas than in others; once uneven pock-marks form in the snow, they focus the sunlight, causing those areas to sublimate ever faster. Spiky penitentes get left behind, unmelted. The tallest penitentes can reach 12 feet (4 meters) high.
(Image Credit: European Southern Observatory)

Where the Snow Is Like Knives

These sharp snow formations make the white stuff look uninviting. They’re called penitentes, and although they can form at high altitudes anywhere, there’s no place better to see them than in the Dry Andes of Chile and Argentina, way up past 13,000 feet (about 4,000 meters).

Penitentes, named after pointy hats worn by people doing penance for their sins in Christian traditions, form in very cold, dry air, where the water in snow sublimates, or turns directly into vapor without melting first. Sublimation randomly occurs faster in some areas than in others; once uneven pock-marks form in the snow, they focus the sunlight, causing those areas to sublimate ever faster. Spiky penitentes get left behind, unmelted. The tallest penitentes can reach 12 feet (4 meters) high.

(Image Credit: European Southern Observatory)

Where the Life is Very Old.
To get a sense of how life on Earth used to be, visit Shark Bay, Australia, one of the very few places on the planet where you can see living stromatolites. These structures are rounded towers of sediment built over thousands of years by cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae. The stromatolites at Shark Bay are a few thousand years old, but they’re nearly identical to the life that thrived on Earth 3.5 billion years ago, when oxygen made up just 1 percent of the atmosphere. Though they’re found in a few extra-salty bodies of water around the world, stromatolites are at their most diverse and most abundant at Shark Bay.

Where the Life is Very Old.

To get a sense of how life on Earth used to be, visit Shark Bay, Australia, one of the very few places on the planet where you can see living stromatolites. These structures are rounded towers of sediment built over thousands of years by cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae. The stromatolites at Shark Bay are a few thousand years old, but they’re nearly identical to the life that thrived on Earth 3.5 billion years ago, when oxygen made up just 1 percent of the atmosphere. Though they’re found in a few extra-salty bodies of water around the world, stromatolites are at their most diverse and most abundant at Shark Bay.

This flower is called the Chia (Salvia columbariae). The seeds of this flower were an important component of the diet of a number of Native American groups in California and the southwest, and also had medicinal uses. It also appears to be a serpentine-tolerant species.

This flower is called the Chia (Salvia columbariae). The seeds of this flower were an important component of the diet of a number of Native American groups in California and the southwest, and also had medicinal uses. It also appears to be a serpentine-tolerant species.