jimparsonsfrance:

Jim Parsons — photographed by Aaron Fallon (May 2012)All the pics on http://jimparsons.fr :)

jimparsonsfrance:

Jim Parsons — photographed by Aaron Fallon (May 2012)
All the pics on http://jimparsons.fr :)

sciencesoup:

Magnetic Soap

A research team at the University of Bristol have worked on soaps sensitive to light, carbon dioxide, changes in pH, temperature, and pressure, but this time they’ve really struck gold—well, iron. They’ve produced the world’s first magnetic soap. It’s made by dissolving iron particles in water that contains chloride and bromide ions, which are materials commonly found in household items like mouthwash and fabric conditioner. While investigating on a sub-atomic level, researchers found that the iron particles were not only joining the soap molecules, but were also clumping together to form iron nanoparticles, and these metallic centres were strong enough to react to a magnetic field just like iron filings would. In tests where this new metallic soap was mixed in with an organic solution, a magnetic attraction was able to overcome both gravity and surface tension to lift the soap right out. Because of this, the soap possibly has a future as a pollution-controlling detergent—for example, in oil spill clean ups. After the iron-laced soap dissolves harmful oils, it can simply be lifted right out of a sensitive environment by manipulating its magnetic properties, minimising further environmental impact.

somebody-like-you2011:

300 year old Beech trees, known as “The Dark Hedges,” line the Breagah Road in Northern Ireland.

somebody-like-you2011:

300 year old Beech trees, known as “The Dark Hedges,” line the Breagah Road in Northern Ireland.

Succulents are not really "basically indestructible." It's a common misconception, but they need care and specific conditions, just like any other plants. The enormous variety also results in an enormous variety of needs that are hard to generalize about and easy to get wrong. Beginners and experts kill them all the time. No offense to you, you're just repeating what you've heard, but this is a pet peeve of mine because it then discourages people that much more when the plants die. — Asked by fuzzytrees

Thank you so much for the follow-up information on succulents.  I am sharing the info with my followers.  I love succulents, but have very little experience with caring for them (or plants in general), so it is nice to have some information from someone that does.   I hope this doesn’t deter anyone from giving them a try, but will clarify what expectations they should have.  They truly are a beautiful plant with so many interesting varieties. 

holymoleculesbatman:

Magnesium and Copper burning under a pure Oxygen flame.

nabokovsnotebook:

Carol Gouthro’s sculptures are inspired by botanical forms. Her work was featured on Ceramics Now magazine. 

laura-morrow:

quilled brain by Sarah Yakawonis

laura-morrow:

quilled brain by Sarah Yakawonis

ruineshumaines:

Paper Sculptures by Peter Gentenaar.

seafarers:

Pretty Pretty

seafarers:

Pretty Pretty

staceythinx:

These gorgeous photos of Antarctica were originally part of a 2006 Australian Parliament House Exhibition, but I like how they look a little like travel posters for one of the most inhospitable places on the planet.